Ten Must-Read Memoirs

by | Nov 18, 2015 | Craft: Memoir, Other Helpful Information | 2 comments

Review Board Is Now Open! SPECIAL CALL Poetry and Short Prose!

Day(s)

:

Hour(s)

:

Minute(s)

:

Second(s)

Deadline: Thursday, September 16th

memoirs

November is National Memoir Month! While many writers are currently participating in NaNoWriMo, some are jogging their memories for personal recollections and old family stories to inspire their memoirs. If you’re thinking about writing “the story of you”—or you’re just looking for a great read—here are some of our favorite memoirs to help you get started:

 

teacher man1. Teacher Man, by Frank McCourt

Frank McCourt’s career kicked off at the ripe age of sixty-six, when his memoir Angela’s Ashes was published. A Pulitzer Prize and international recognition followed. But, prior to his writing career, McCourt was a teacher for three decades. Teacher Man recounts his experiences as a teacher and reveals how McCourt found his voice as a writer. 

 

 

 

 


malala2. 
I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai and Christina Lamb

At the age of fifteen, Malala was shot in the head by a member of the Taliban. In her town in Pakistan, the Taliban had banned girls from going to school. Malala spoke out for the education of girls, telling the world through interviews about her experiences living under Taliban rule. Because she was well-known for being a strong advocate for girls’ education in her country, the Taliban targeted her. Malala survived and became the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace prize.

 

 

 

 

Submit to Review Board

 

color of water3. The Color of Water, by James McBride. The daughter of an Orthodox Jewish rabbi, Rachel Shilsky married an African-American minister. Twice widowed, she struggled to ensure a secure future for her children despite racial tensions. The author, James McBride, was one of her eleven children. He won a scholarship to Oberlin College and built a successful career as a journalist, author, and musical composer. The title of the book reflects their struggle with racism from all sides: tension from whites, blacks, and Jews.

 

 

 

 

4. Wild, by Cheryl Strayedwild

Cheryl’s life spiraled out of control after her divorce and the death of her mother. With no knowledge of or experience with backpacking, she loaded a seventy-pound pack and hit the Pacific Crest Trail, hoping to rediscover herself. She hiked 1,100 trails—alone. The book was a 2012 New York Times best seller and was adapted into an Oscar-nominated movie in 2014.

 

 

 

 

 

5. Girl, Interrupted, by Susanna Kaysengirl interrupted

After Susanna Kaysen downed fifty aspirin in an attempted suicide, she was sent to McLean Psychiatric Hospital near Boston. In the late 1960s, the list of elite patients at McLean made it an Ivy League institution in its own way—once featuring Sylvia Plath and Ray Charles. Surrounded by patients who wrapped everything in toilet paper or who obsessed over chicken, Kaysen explores the meaning of madness—and how she was defined by it.

 

 

 

 

6. Bringing Up Bébé, by Pamela Druckermanbringing up bebe

What’s the difference between French and American parenting? Former Wall Street Journal reporter Druckerman asked herself the same question after she moved to Paris and raised three toddlers there. She found that French parents seemed to sip coffee wayside at schoolyards while their children played. In contrast, American parents stood within arm’s length, ready to intervene in shoves, kicks, and falls. French children seemed to obediently eat all the veggies on their plates, while American children seemed to turn their noses up at turnips.

 

 

 

7. Between a Rock and a Hard Place, by Aron Ralstonbetween a rock

When an 800-pound boulder pinned his hand to a Utah canyon wall, Ralston was trapped for six days. He hadn’t told anyone where he was going, and faced a lingering death—if a flash flood didn’t kill him first. His determination to get back home to his loved ones, and the act of bravery that finally set him free, make this an incredible story of survival.

 

 

 

 

julie and julia8. Julie & Julia: My Year of Cooking Dangerously, by Julie Powell

Julie worked for a corporation heading the redevelopment of the World Trade Center site in New York City. To deal with the emotional impact of her work, she decided to cook all 524 recipes in Julia Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking in just 365 days. A film adaptation was released in 2009.

 

 

 

 

 

9. Helen Keller: The Story of My Life, by Helen Kellerhelen keller

After Keller contracted a debilitating fever as a toddler, she lost her sight and hearing. By the time she was seven years old, Helen was unruly, uncontrollable, and destined to be confined in a mental ward. Desperate, her parents relentlessly searched for someone to break the communication barrier between Helen and the world. That person: new graduate of the Perkins Institute for the Blind in Boston, Anne Sullivan.

 

 

 

 

10. Marley and Me, by John Groganmarley and me

When John and Jenny brought home a yellow lab puppy to start their lives together—they were in for a wilder-than-expected ride. The 97-pound dog broke through drywall and ate nearly everything in sight—including jewelry and their couches. He failed obedience school; a vet even recommended using tranquilizers to subdue him. Despite his wild side, Marley grew into a part of the family and served as a faithful companion through troubling times.

 

 

 

 

Writer QuestionsQUESTION: What is your favorite memoir?

 

2 Comments

  1. Tiana Tozer

    The top three memoirs in my book are:

    The Water is Wide
    which ties with Crazy for the Storm
    Orange is the New Black

    Reply
  2. Samantha

    These two really stay with you:
    “The Splendid Things We Planned” by Blake Bailey
    “The Glass Castle” by Jeannette Walls

    Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Review Board Is Now Open! SPECIAL CALL Poetry and Short Prose!

Day(s)

:

Hour(s)

:

Minute(s)

:

Second(s)

 

 

Search

Reviews

“Getting that first poem published was the hardest threshold to cross. My team at Writer’s Relief kept encouraging me…then came the acceptance! We celebrated…then I continued writing, and Writer’s Relief continued doing the wonderful work they do!”

—King Grossman, Writer
(Watch King’s video testimonial here!)

“Every piece I have sent out with their help has been accepted for publication! I am looking forward to working with the team on getting my new novel out into the world.”

Services Catalog

Free Publishing Leads
and Tips!

Featured Articles



 

Featured Video

Follow us!



YES, IT'S MY LUCKY DAY!
Sign me up for
FREE Publishing Leads & Tips
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

WHY? Because our insider
know-how has helped
writers get over 18,000 acceptances.

FREE Publishing Leads and Tips! Our e-publication, Submit Write Now!, delivered weekly to your inbox.
  • BEST (and proven) submission tips
  • Hot publishing leads
  • Calls to submit
  • Contest alerts
  • Notification of industry changes
  • And much more!
close-link


STOP! BEFORE YOU GO...
Sign me up for
FREE Publishing Leads & Tips
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

WHY? Because our insider
know-how has helped
writers get over 18,000 acceptances.

FREE Publishing Leads and Tips! Our e-publication, Submit Write Now!, delivered weekly to your inbox.
  • BEST (and proven) submission tips
  • Hot publishing leads
  • Calls to submit
  • Contest alerts
  • Notification of industry changes
  • And much more!
close-link
Live Chat Software

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This