Celebrate Dictionary Day With Our Favorite Words!

by | Oct 15, 2015 | Interesting News for Writers, The Writing Life, Writer's Relief | 4 comments

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Deadline: Wednesday, September 14

dictionary day

Happy Dictionary Day! Did you know: Dictionary Day is actually the birthday of lexicographer Noah Webster, who published his first dictionary in 1806? Webster started his second, more comprehensive dictionary in 1807—and it took twenty-six years to complete! To celebrate this important day in grammar history (at least, it is to us!), we at Writer’s Relief want to share our favorite words with you.

All definitions are sourced from Merriam-Webster Dictionary and Dictionary.com.

adnauseam2

Ad Nauseam (adv.) — Stephanie 

Referring to something that has been done or repeated so often that it has become annoying or tiresome

It doesn’t get used enough as a word, but it happens relatively frequently.

 

Anachronism_DD3

Anachronism (n.) — Kelly

  1. Something (such as a word, an object, or an event) that is mistakenly placed in a time where it does not belong in a story, movie, etc.
  2. A person or a thing that seems to belong to the past and not to fit in the present

I enjoy this word, because as a member of a medieval reenactment society, I am, myself, an anachronism!

 

Anagnorisis_DD1

Anagnorisis (n.) — Matthew

The point in the plot, especially of a tragedy, at which the protagonist recognizes his or her or some other character’s true identity or discovers the true nature of his or her own situation

I love classical tragedies and literature; the Ancient Greeks knew what was up. It’s also something that I feel I have personally experienced multiple times in life, serene moments of sublime self/situational-realization.

 

Antidisestablishmentarianism _DD2

Antidisestablishmentarianism (n.) — Ronnie

Opposition to the withdrawal of state support or recognition from an established church, especially the Anglican Church in 19th-century England

I remember my grandfather teaching it to me before I started going to school. He thought it was an important thing for me to know.

 

Ataraxia_DD

Ataraxia (n.) — Tim

  1. A state of freedom from emotional disturbance and anxiety; tranquility
  2. Surrounding oneself with trustworthy and affectionate friends and, most importantly, being an affectionate, virtuous person, worthy of trust

Descending from a Greek philosophy that wholly embodies compassion, it is harmonious in sound, in style, in definition—and as we venture through the stresses of life, the idea of transcending that turmoil, up into the echelon of complete serenity, even if for a moment, is alluring and beautiful.

 

Austere _DD4

 

Austere (adj.)  — Gema

  1. Simple or plain: not fancy
  2. Of a person: having a serious and unfriendly quality; having few pleasures: simple and harsh

It’s one of my favorite words because when you say it, it sounds luxurious and portrays someone classy and rich, but the word actually means the opposite of what it sounds like.

 

Bupkus _DD

Bupkus (n.) — Carol

  1. The least amount
  2. Nothing

Bupkus is the alternate spelling for bubkes, but I feel it reads more like it sounds as BUPKUS. Here’s the best part! Origin of BUBKES – Yiddish (probably short for kozebubkes, literally, goat droppings). How can you not love a word with origins in goat droppings?!

 

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But _DD

But (conj.) — Jon

Used to introduce something contrasting with what has already been mentioned

It’s a bit inspiring that such a small word could hold so much power—a complete reversal in only one syllable.

 

Capricious _DD

Capricious (adj.) — Anthony

  1. Changing often and quickly; often changing suddenly in mood or behavior
  2. Not logical or reasonable: based on an idea, desire, etc. that is not possible to predict

I like the way it sounds, and it’s the first word that I liked the sound of.

 

Discombobulate _DD

Discombobulate (v.) — Allison

Upset, confuse

This is my favorite word purely because of how fun it is to say…I wish I had a more meaningful reason than that, but really, I just love the sound of it.

 

Eclectic3

Eclectic (adj.) — Joey 

Including things taken from many different sources

I think it does a good job of describing art, people, and life in general. It’s also really fun to say.

 

Epiphany_DD

Epiphany (n.) — Krystal

A moment in which you suddenly see or understand something in a new or very clear way

This word perfectly captures more than several occasions in my short life! I love that we can constantly discover a new facet to a person, place, idea, or object that we thought we knew. And it’s refreshing to remember that I shouldn’t take things at face value.

 

Flummox

Flummox (v.) — David 

To bewilder; confound; confuse

I love flummox because when I use the word in a sentence, most people are confounded by it!

 

Friend_DD

Friend (n.) — Hermine

  1. A person who you like and enjoy being with
  2. A person who helps or supports someone or something (such as a cause or charity)

I find it a very comforting word.

 

Malevolent _DD2

Malevolent (adj.) — Nicole

Having, showing, or arising from intense often vicious ill will, spite, or hatred

I love it because it’s a word for evil and hatred, and yet it sounds beautiful. If you knew nothing about the word, you’d expect it to mean something nicer.

 

Nocturne _DD

Nocturne (n.) — Morgan

  1. A piece of music especially for the piano that has a soft and somewhat sad melody
  2. A work of art dealing with evening or night

The word itself evokes a particularly somber feeling. Musical pieces that incorporate the nocturne resonate deeply with me, and thus the word has always been a favorite.

 

OM

Om (n.) — Kevin

A mantra consisting of the sound \ˈōm\ and used in contemplation of ultimate reality

I like the word because I was told that the symbol for om was the sign representing the sound of human consciousness.

 

Ostranenie

Ostranenie (n.)  Nicky 

Defamiliarization

I love this word because it encourages people to see common things as strange, wild, or unfamiliar; defamiliarizing what is known in order to know it differently or more deeply.

 

Persnickety_DD

Persnickety (adj.) — Jill

  1. Fussy about minor details
  2. Requiring great precision

I love this word because it’s so much fun to say!

 

Petrichor_DD

Petrichor (n.) — Joe

A pleasant smell that frequently accompanies the first rain after a long period of warm, dry weather

I just love the way it sounds. And I always thought there was something poetic about rainfall and how it’s often accompanied by such a sweet smell.

 

Precarious

Precarious (adj.) —  Ally

  1. Dependent on uncertain premises: dubious
  2. Dependent on chance circumstances, unknown conditions, or uncertain developments

Not only do I love the sound of the word, I also think it’s a really specific and evocative adjective to use while writing.

 

Serendipity_DD

Serendipity (n.) — Meg

Luck that takes the form of finding valuable or pleasant things that are not looked for

Wendy, who also chose this word, says that she’s partial to serendipity for its meaning, as well as its pronunciation. Such a blithe, lyrical sound!

 

Soi-disant_DD3

Soi-disant (adj.) — Steven

Self-proclaimed, so-called

When I came across this word, I was instantly hooked, both for its meaning and its pronunciation—it’s always fun to sound a little French!

 

Vicissitude_DD1

Vicissitude (n.) — Daniele

  1. The quality or state of being changeable:  mutability
  2. Alternating change:  succession

It sounds exactly like what it means—and I love that the English language has such a beautiful word for such a colloquial concept, “ups and downs”!

 

Wanderlust_DD1

Wanderlust (n.) — Rachel

  1. A strong desire to travel
  2. Strong longing for or impulse toward wandering

It so accurately describes the feeling of an intense need to travel, this tug toward the road. It simply captures very well the meaning of a feeling that can be difficult to describe.

 

Wonderful_DD3

Wonderful (adj.)  Jen

  1. Exciting
  2. Unusually good

It’s my favorite word because it makes me think of marvelous things!

 

Writer QuestionsQUESTION: What’s your favorite word? Tell us in the comments below!

 

4 Comments

  1. Gifford MacShane

    Aubergine: from the French for “eggplant”, a deep blackish purple

    I love this word because 1. it’s both a noun and an adjective & 2. purple!

    Reply
  2. Mi West

    Clickbait – i like its blend of expressive power and humor.

    Reply
  3. Valerie

    Inspiration
    I like the way this word sounds and it’s meaning is a blessing to all of us.

    Reply
  4. Lisa

    Good-this word has many meanings and alot that it means. It’s the opposite of bad. Which is why I like it. It’s also the opposite of evil; which is another reason to like it.

    Reply

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