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Self-Test: What’s Your Best Time Of Day To Write?

besttimeofday

Have you ever noticed which time of the day you feel most inspired to write? Whether you enjoy busy cafés in the early afternoon or the quiet of your desk late at night, there’s a time of day when you do your best creative work. This quick self-test will help you zero in on your best time of day to focus on writing.

Choose the answer for each question that most closely applies to you:

When you first wake up, what are you most eager to do?

A. Write: there’s a journal/laptop on my nightstand so I can start jotting down my thoughts the moment I wake up.

B. Go back to sleep and dream of how I should continue my story.

C. Get some coffee and breakfast, maybe do a morning workout, and get going!

D. It depends on whether it’s my day off. I can sleep in or get up and write about the dream I had last night.

 

By 10:00 AM, how much writing have you accomplished?

A. I have completed the short story or poem I have set as a goal for the day.

B. I’m still trying to wake up, so I decide to make a coffee run.

C. Writing? I have tons of other tasks to complete during the day before I can even think about writing.

D. Hmmm…maybe I’ve finished editing some old work. Maybe I’ve started something new.

 

After a long day at work you’re:

A. Making sure my writing supplies are at my bedside so I can start writing the minute my eyes open.

B. Wrapping up an essay I’ve been thinking about all day.

C. Having a little “me” time before I officially start putting pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard).

D. Instagramming a photo of the teacup next to my keyboard or journal. I needed a mini-break before rereading what I’ve written so far.

 

What kind of posts do your readers see most on your social media platforms?

A. Coffee or the sunrise with my journal cover. Maybe some morning motivational posts.

B. Quick, clever notes about what I have planned during the day. I try to entertain my followers.

C. Quotes paired with photos of the moon. Everyone else is asleep, but I’m admiring the night sky.

D. It could be an image, something to share that caught my eye, or a text-heavy message. I like to mix it up!

 

When you write you are:

A. Listening to the early morning sounds of my neighborhood as they drift through my window.

B. At the library or café where I can people-watch for inspiration.

C. Sitting in the only lit area of the house and enjoying the quiet.

D. Multitasking, because my super power is being distracted and freewriting at the same time.

 

When your friends and coworkers are talking about last night’s episode of everyone’s favorite show, you’re:

A. In on the conversation. I did all my writing early in the day, so I had time to watch my favorite shows.

B. A bit confused. I was finishing up a poem I started after lunch, so I missed the first twenty minutes of the episode.

C. Urging everyone not to spoil it for me! I was so wrapped up in writing, I lost track of time and missed the show.

D. Listening, but not fully engaged in the conversation. I started watching the show, but it gave me a great idea for a story line and I left the room to make some quick notes.

 

Here are the results of your self-test: When’s your best time to write?

 

If you picked mostly A: You’re a Rise and Shine Writer.

So many ideas pop into your head before your eyes even open—by the time you yawn and stretch, you’re ready to write! You’ll get a lot of writing accomplished before most people have had their first cup of coffee.

 

If you picked mostly B: You’re a Midday Maven Writer.

Any time between noon and sundown is when you hit your creative stride. It’s hard for you to be perky in the morning, and in the evening you have end-of-day tasks that demand your attention. You’re most likely to come up with plot ideas or lines of poetry during your drives to and from work, or on your workday break. So once you get a moment to write, the ideas are ready to put down on paper.

 

If you picked mostly C: You’re a Witching Writer.

Don’t panic—we’re not implying that you’re casting spells at midnight! But your creativity flows best during the witching hours of the night. You shine better with the stars! Make sure you eat something to boost your energy without giving yourself too much of a jolt, like cashews or carrots, and stay hydrated with water. Because there’s a good chance that by the time you’re ready for bed, the Rise and Shine Writers will be just waking up.

 

If you picked mostly D: You’re a Whipping Writer.

Remember that popular grade school trick when you would quickly wiggle a pencil back and forth to make it appear rubbery? Well, that’s how flexible your writing skills are! An actual whip can twist and turn whichever way its handler chooses. So it doesn’t matter if it’s a sunrise session, during lunch break, or after everyone has gone to bed—you can write at any time, and anywhere.

 

Writer Questions

QUESTION: What’s your favorite time to write?

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